Protowilson's Bits

Some art, some NSFW, some sharing, some ranting.

My art tag

My Steam Profile - beware, I'm rubbish.

The Tumblask for 'Severed'.

My art blog.

Currently reading: this book.

Recent Tweets @protowilson
Who I Follow
mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

  • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
  • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
  • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

(via drtanner-sfw)

drtanner-sfw:

howtoskinatiger:

weaselwoman:

anti-radfem:

pookyhorse:

hellhag:

weaselwoman:

A pug so exhausted that he is trying to sleep standing up because he cannot breathe laying down.

This is a very common occurrence in pugs (and other brachy breeds) that is just horrifying. Pugs who do this will need a special wall bed to sleep standing up. 

Why intentionally doom an animal to a life time of suffering before it’s even born because it’s “cute” or “breed standard”?

Are pugs still adorable for your visual pleasure now?

Well those tags are rude. Pugs have the best personality of any dog I’ve ever had or have been around. I agree with the breeding..it’s really cruel…but damn don’t hate on those cute faces!

Well hellhag you are part of the problem..if people continue to think those smashed faces(which do a huge part in how they breath) are sooo cute then pugs will just continue to suffer. You people need to GET IT. These dogs suffer for their “cuteness.” Dogs are meant to have snouts. Are you willing to have dogs tortured in their deformed bodies for their cuteness? Damn how cruel. 

???? Are you kidding me? There’s nothing we can do to help them, those are the characteristics of that dog.

Actually, pugs of the old days never had these smashed in faces. This is due to selective breeding. If we can selective breed them into a smashed faced tragedy, we can selective breed them back into what they once were, however, the issue is, people cling to the “but it’s too cute” due to lack of education or ignorance, and the strict breed standard that dictates they should be a smashed faced tragedy. Pugs back, say, in the 1800s could breathe well, didn’t have a super squished in face and had great, straight legs and a nice spine free of scoliosis. We can totally breed a pug back into what it should be, problem is, people are not willing. 

Here’s some 19th century paintings of what pugs used to look like before the invention of the show ring;

Notice something? Yes, they all have proper muzzles and were probably much fitter and healthier than today pugs! THIS is what the breed should look like. Today’s pugs are miserable caricatures of the original dogs. 

I find it tragically hilarious that there are actual people who actually believe that there’s nothing we can do to change the characteristics of the dogs we breed, like they don’t know how those dogs became the way they are in the first place. I mean, do they think wild flatfaced pugs were running about at some point in the distant past and that we domesticated them? 

We made the pug breed - along with many others - into the unhealthy, suffering-laden clusterfuck they are today, and with careful, considerate breeding, we can make the breed better again. In fact, this is something they’re actively trying to do in Germany with the retro pug! Look, they have snouts!

If you honestly want to argue that the health problems suffered by pugs and other similar breeds don’t matter because they’re “cute” and that they shouldn’t change, you are an incredibly selfish person and you need to never, ever own an animal

Retro pugs are great!

I must confess that I’m starting to get more and more perturbed by the flat-faced cats and dogs. Honestly, they’re faces look like they’ve run into a wall. It’s not cute. It’s horrifying; even more so when you stop and think about how that must affect their breathing. 

An animal that’s gasping, waddling and with its eyes bugging out of its skull is not cute or adorable. It is terrifying and a cruelty, and a lot of cats and dogs are being put through this anatomical distortion, and it needs to stop.

demoog:

WIP Soldier. Laziness and procrastination yay!

A cute Balloonicorn bandana for your real-life noggin.

If you like it, please consider giving it a thumbs up here.

readtheaboutpage:

donejustdone:

500daysofevilexes:

loseegoose:

 

This is legit.

More PSAs need to stop worrying about offending people and get down to the nitty gritty like this. It’s the only way to open so many eyes.

shit

If people are offended, they are probably guilty.

(via brideoflister)

scoregasm:

crystal-shines:

What a delightful sleeping bag

If someone broke into your tent trying to murder you you could just scare them off as a bear.

A present for Heavy.

(via neener-nina)

Last night I dreamt I grew a beard. It was highly average.

tastefullyoffensive:

There are two kinds of parrots…

(via drtanner-sfw)

Robin Hobb’s got a new book coming out.

It’s got the Fool in it!